Global Policy Forum

Roundtable discussion in Berlin: The SDGs in the face of looming financial crises

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Mass protests are currently shaking a growing number of countries worldwide. In Ecuador, Chile and Argentina, in Egypt and Lebanon, millions of people are taking to the streets. The reasons are complex, but the trigger is often a forced austerity policy by governments. There is a great danger that the situation will worsen further in 2020. New vicious circles of debt and austerity policies with potentially devastating social and ecological consequences are looming. This will considerably restrict the policy space of many governments -- and thus also their ability to implement the 2030 Agenda and their Sustainable Development Goals (SDGs). At the roundtable discussion, we would like to discuss the dangers of a spreading global financial crisis, the possible consequences for the realization of the SDGs and the political consequences to be derived from this, based on a new study by the Global Policy Forum. This will be done together with civil society representatives from various regions, who are going to report "at first-hand" on the causes of the crises and the demands of the protest movements.




January 13, 2020 | Global Policy Forum et al.

The SDGs in the face of looming financial crises

Debt, austerity policies and worldwide protest

Roundtable discussion

29 January 2020, 5:00-7:00pm
Brot für die Welt, Caroline-Michaelis-Str. 1, 10115 Berlin
ROOM: 0.K.06 Christian Berg


Mass protests are currently shaking a growing number of countries worldwide. In Ecuador, Chile and Argentina, in Egypt and Lebanon, millions of people are taking to the streets. The reasons are complex, but the trigger is often a forced austerity policy by governments. In doing so, they are usually reacting to escalating foreign debt, deteriorating global economic conditions, and pressure from international financial institutions like the International Monetary Fund (IMF).

There is a great danger that the situation will worsen further in 2020. New vicious circles of debt and austerity policies with potentially devastating social and ecological consequences are looming. This will considerably restrict the policy space of many governments -- and thus also their ability to implement the 2030 Agenda and their Sustainable Development Goals (SDGs).

At the roundtable discussion, we would like to discuss the dangers of a spreading global financial crisis, the possible consequences for the realization of the SDGs and the political consequences to be derived from this, based on a new study by the Global Policy Forum. This will be done together with civil society representatives from various regions, who are going to report "at first-hand" on the causes of the crises and the demands of the protest movements.

At the heart of the discussion are alternative policy solutions that help to ensure that the 2030 Agenda and its goals do not fall victim to a new global financial crisis and inadequate crisis management.

Programme

5:00 Welcome: Eva Hanfstängl (Brot für die Welt, Berlin)

5:10 Introduction: Jens Martens (Global Policy Forum, Bonn)

5:30 Spotlights:

  • Roberto Bissio (Social Watch, Montevideo)
  • María Graciela Cuervo (Development Alternatives with Women for a New Era, Santo Domingo/Suva)
  • Ziad Abdel Samad (Arab NGO Network for Development, Beirut)
  • Ignacio Saiz (Center for Economic and Social Rights, New York)

6:00 Discussion

6:50 Conclusions for German policy-makers: Klaus Schilder (MISEREOR, Aachen/Berlin)

Chair: Barbara Adams (Global Policy Forum, New York)


Download of the invitation and the programme.

As room capacity is very limited, we would like to ask you to register at your earliest convenience here.



 

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